new arrival His Truth Is Marching On: John high quality Lewis and sale the Power of Hope online sale

new arrival His Truth Is Marching On: John high quality Lewis and sale the Power of Hope online sale

new arrival His Truth Is Marching On: John high quality Lewis and sale the Power of Hope online sale

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#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • An intimate and revealing portrait of civil rights icon and longtime U.S. congressman John Lewis, linking his life to the painful quest for justice in America from the 1950s to the present—from the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of The Soul of America 

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE WASHINGTON POST AND COSMOPOLITAN 

John Lewis, who at age twenty-five marched in Selma, Alabama, and was beaten on the Edmund Pettus Bridge, was a visionary and a man of faith. Drawing on decades of wide-ranging interviews with Lewis, Jon Meacham writes of how this great-grandson of a slave and son of an Alabama tenant farmer was inspired by the Bible and his teachers in nonviolence, Reverend James Lawson and Martin Luther King, Jr., to put his life on the line in the service of what Abraham Lincoln called “the better angels of our nature.” From an early age, Lewis learned that nonviolence was not only a tactic but a philosophy, a biblical imperative, and a transforming reality. At the age of four, Lewis, ambitious to become a minister, practiced by preaching to his family’s chickens. When his mother cooked one of the chickens, the boy refused to eat it—his first act, he wryly recalled, of nonviolent protest. Integral to Lewis’s commitment to bettering the nation was his faith in humanity and in God—and an unshakable belief in the power of hope. 
 
Meacham calls Lewis “as important to the founding of a modern and multiethnic twentieth- and twenty-first-century America as Thomas Jefferson and James Madison and Samuel Adams were to the initial creation of the Republic itself in the eighteenth century.” A believer in the injunction that one should love one''s neighbor as oneself, Lewis was arguably a saint in our time, risking limb and life to bear witness for the powerless in the face of the powerful. In many ways he brought a still-evolving nation closer to realizing its ideals, and his story offers inspiration and illumination for Americans today who are working for social and political change.

Review

“A valuable discussion of an extraordinary man who deserves our everlasting admiration and gratitude.” —The Washington Post

“Meacham tells this story with his customary eloquence . . . a welcome reminder of the heroic sacrifices and remarkable achievements of those young radicals—20th-century America’s greatest generation.” —Eric Foner, The New York Times Book Review

His Truth Is Marching On is well worth reading, especially for readers with an abiding interest in the intersection of religion and progressive politics . . . an inspiring book that comes at a time when the world desperately needs inspiration.” —NPR

“An elegant, moving portrait of a giant of post-1950 American history.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Meacham talks directly to the reader, his eyes burning, his voice calm but quaking with emotion. . . . Meacham takes the familiar story of the scars and bruises on John Lewis’ body as literally an embodiment of the struggles of the civil rights era, and brings alive with cinematic conviction the backstory of how specifically those blows came about.” —SF Chronicle

“His Truth Is Marching On combines careful reporting, historic photographs, and detailed notes and appendices. But the book ultimately shines brightest as a story of how one man made a difference by believing in justice and offering hope for a nation in difficult times.” —Chapter 16

About the Author

Jon Meacham is a Pulitzer Prize–winning biographer. A contributing writer for The New York Times Book Review and a contributing editor of Time magazine, he is the author of the New York Times bestsellers The Hope of Glory, Destiny and Power: The American Odyssey of George Herbert Walker Bush, Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House, American Gospel, and Franklin and Winston. Meacham, who holds the Rogers Chair in the American Presidency at Vanderbilt University, lives in Nashville.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter One

A Hard Life, a Serious Life

Troy, Alabama: Beginnings to 1957


Work and put your trust in God, and God’s gonna take care of his children. God’s gonna take care of his children.

—Oft-repeated counsel from Willie Mae Carter Lewis, John’s mother


Costly grace . . . is costly because it costs a man his life, and it is grace because it gives a man the only true life.

—Dietrich Bonhoeffer


For John Lewis, slavery wasn’t an abstraction. It was as real to him as his great-grandfather, Frank Carter, who lived until his great-grandson was seven. Light-skinned, hardworking, and self-confident, Carter, whom Lewis called “Grandpapa,” had been born into enslavement in Pike County, Alabama, in 1862. The family has long believed that a white man was likely Frank Carter’s father—Carter and his own son, whose name was Dink, were, Lewis recalled, “light, very fair, and their hair was different, what we could call good hair”—but the subject was shrouded in secrecy and silence. This much is clear: The trajectory of the infant Frank Carter’s life was fundamentally changed on Thursday, January 1, 1863, when President Lincoln declared the enslaved in the seceded Confederate States of America were now free, and by the ratification, in December 1865, of the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution, which abolished slavery “within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.”

Coming of age in Reconstruction and under Jim Crow, Carter was driven and skilled in the world available to him. Yet the “new birth of freedom” of which Lincoln had spoken at Gettysburg in 1863 had failed to come fully into being after the Confederate surrender at Appomattox in 1865. Within eight months of the war’s end, Alabama’s legislature had instituted a Black Code to curtail the rights of African Americans and give the old ways new form and new force. In 1866, the federal government, driven by Republicans in Congress, sought to bring interracial democracy to the South. The reactionary Black Code was repealed; new constitutions were written; black people were by and large allowed to vote; and African American candidates were elected to federal, state, and local office.

White reaction was fierce. The Ku Klux Klan was founded in these postbellum years—a Confederate general named Edmund Pettus was a grand dragon—and, by 1901, when Frank Carter was nearly forty, white Alabama had reverted as much as it could to an antebellum order by legalizing segregation, circumscribing suffrage, and banning interracial marriage. At the dawn of a new century, then, the old color line had been redrawn and reinforced.

Alabama’s 1901 constitution establishing white supremacy had been debated in Montgomery from May to September of that year, ending in time for the cotton harvest. Fifty miles away from the state capitol, Frank Carter leased his land from J. S. “Big Josh” Copeland, a major figure in Troy, the Pike County seat. Carter worked his way to an unusual level of sharecropping called “standing rent,” which meant he paid Copeland to lease the land but did not owe the landlord any of his yield beyond the rent. Diligent, resourceful, and determined, Lewis’s great-grandfather did the best he could under the constraints of his time. “He couldn’t read or write,” his great-grandson said, “but he could do financial transactions in his head faster than the man on the other side of the desk could work them out with a pen and paper.” Carter took great pride in just about everything he did. “He would sit in his rocking chair on his porch,” John Lewis recalled, “and he acted like he was the king.”

In a way, he was—at least of the piece of Pike County that came to be known as Carter’s Quarters. It was there, in 1914, that his granddaughter Willie Mae was born to Frank’s son Dink. In 1932, she married Edward Lewis, who had been born (along with his twin sister, Edna) in 1909 in Roberta, Georgia. Eddie’s mother, Lula, had come to Carter’s Quarters after a separation from her husband, Henry. Willie Mae and Eddie met at Macedonia Baptist Church and fell in love. He called her “Sugarfoot”; she called him “Shorty.”

They were to have ten children: Ora, Edward, Sammy, Grant, Freddie, Adolph, William, Ethel, Rosa (also called Mae)—and John Robert Lewis, who was born in a shotgun shack in Carter’s Quarters on a cold Wednesday, February 21, 1940. Readers of The Montgomery Advertiser that day saw headlines about the German sinking of three British ships and Democratic anxiety about President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s silence on whether he’d seek a third term. Closer to home, The Troy Messenger reported on a local man’s suicide—he had jumped from the nineteenth floor of a downtown Montgomery hotel—and announced an upcoming fiddling contest in the County Activities building that would include Harpo Kidwell, “national champion harmonica king.” The Troy paper also published a biblical “Thought for the Day,” drawn from First Peter: “Beloved, think it not strange concerning the fiery trial which is to try you.”

It was a harrowing era to be black, Southern, and American. In June 1940, when John Lewis was four months old, Jesse Thornton, a twenty-six-year-old churchgoing African American man who lived twenty miles away from Troy, in Luverne, Alabama, was standing outside a black barbershop when a white Luverne police officer walked by. Thornton allegedly failed to address the policeman with the honorific “Mister.” Thornton wasn’t thinking, or at least wasn’t thinking the way a black man was supposed to think under a regime of white supremacy. He was lynched, his corpse dumped in a nearby swamp. Thornton’s body was found several days later floating in the Patsaliga River, mauled and gnawed by vultures and buzzards. According to the Luverne newspaper, “the cause of his death is a mystery that will probably never be solved.” In a typewritten report on the incident, Charles A. J. McPherson, the secretary of the Birmingham branch of the NAACP, wrote, “These lynchings are organized and hushed up too in Hitler fashion and who knows how often?”

Terror could strike African Americans at any time—and justice was bitterly elusive. On the evening of Sunday, September 3, 1944, in Abbeville, Alabama—about fifty miles from the Lewises’ Troy—a twenty-four-year-old African American woman, Recy Taylor, was walking home after services at the Rock Hill Holiness Church. She had a husband and a two-year-old baby. In the darkness, seven white men kidnapped her at gunpoint; six of them gang-raped her. “I’m begging them to leave me alone—don’t shoot me—I got to go home and see about my baby,” Mrs. Taylor recalled. “They wouldn’t let me go. I can’t help but tell the truth of what they done to me.” The NAACP in Montgomery heard about the case and asked one of its members, a woman who happened to have family in Abbeville, to go over and investigate. Rosa Parks accepted the assignment, learned the details of the attack, and helped organize a campaign for justice for Mrs. Taylor, who bravely spoke up about the crime. But there would be no justice: All-white grand juries twice refused to indict the well-known assailants.

There seemed no hope. An omitted “Mister” might get you dumped in a swamp on an otherwise unremarkable summer day; walking home from church could lead to horrific sexual violence. “We know that if we protest we will be called ‘bad niggers,’ ” the novelist Richard Wright wrote in his 1941 book Twelve Million Black Voices. “The Lords of the Land will preach the doctrine of ‘white supremacy’ to the poor whites who are eager to form mobs. In the midst of general hysteria they will seize one of us—it does not matter who, the innocent or guilty—and, as a token, a naked and bleeding body will be dragged through the dusty streets.” That was the way of the world into which John Lewis was born.

His first memory was of his mother’s garden. “There was a little gate, and when you opened the gate, there was a large bucket that filled with rain, and we used it to water the vegetables and the flowers and the plants,” Lewis recalled. “I loved to make things grow, to pour out that water. I somehow always knew that water was good. I would always love raising things.”

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Top reviews from the United States

Mike Pierce
5.0 out of 5 stars
A man with courage and the moral high ground
Reviewed in the United States on August 25, 2020
It is disgraceful what this country has put the Africa American community through and not just during the 60’s. Even to this day we are still fighting the racism that was first birth with this country. We fought a civil war, we passed amendments to our Constitution, enacted... See more
It is disgraceful what this country has put the Africa American community through and not just during the 60’s. Even to this day we are still fighting the racism that was first birth with this country. We fought a civil war, we passed amendments to our Constitution, enacted laws too protect voter rights but most of all people have given their lives for this great cause. John Lewis was a man driven by his beliefs and convictions. The terrible treatment that he and others had to endure is not only hard to read about it is also hard to realize that it is still going on and yet it is right in front of us each and everyday.
Before reading this book I knew a little about Mr. Lewis because of his relationship with MLK Jr but not as much as I should have which this book clearly remedies. I wish this book could be read by everyone; of course, the problem is that those who should read about the struggle, hardships and violence that he and those around him endured will mostly likely not be read by those that need to read it.
I came away from this book with a much better understanding of the time period, the struggle and the man. I have to admit I would have given up many times and moved some where else. What Mr. Lewis went through clearly showed that he was a strong man with great convictions and moral authority. We are all less without him.
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Robyn
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This is a Stunning Book
Reviewed in the United States on August 29, 2020
This is what I needed to read right now in this time of racial turmoil. Meacham''s ability to discuss Lewis''s faith intertwined with an obvious deep understanding of scripture is straight forward and non preachy. This is the first time I have had a sense of peace in months... See more
This is what I needed to read right now in this time of racial turmoil. Meacham''s ability to discuss Lewis''s faith intertwined with an obvious deep understanding of scripture is straight forward and non preachy. This is the first time I have had a sense of peace in months and remembering the wonderful people in the early movement felt like spending time with old friends...friends I shed blood with in the 60s. I still believe in the Beloved Community and it was nice to spend the time remembering why we fought for it.
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Karen
5.0 out of 5 stars
Jon Meacham at his best...telling the story of a true American hero & icon...John Lewis!
Reviewed in the United States on August 25, 2020
His Truth Is Marching on: John Lewis and the Power of Hope is the new release by Jon Meacham. I always look forward to any book written by Jon Meacham, but this one was difficult to read with the recent passing of Congressman John Lewis. We all know of John Lewis from his... See more
His Truth Is Marching on: John Lewis and the Power of Hope is the new release by Jon Meacham. I always look forward to any book written by Jon Meacham, but this one was difficult to read with the recent passing of Congressman John Lewis. We all know of John Lewis from his time in Congress, as well as that horrific day in Selma known as Bloody Sunday. However, most people do not know the true life of John Lewis...those moments in his life that were not a headline on the news. Jon Meacham gives us those moments throughout the pages of this book...from the humble beginnings as a child to the years of activism...John Meacham eloquently tells the story of a true icon and American hero.

This is a book rich in history, and one that everyone should read. John Lewis lead by example, and fought every day of his life for what he believed in. He has never let anyone or anything stop his voice from being heard. This books shows how far we have come as a country, but it also shows how much more work needs to be done in order for us to achieve the one thing John Lewis fought for his entire life...equal rights for every single person.

John Lewis once said, "Do not get lost in a sea of despair. Be hopeful, be optimistic. Our struggle is not the struggle of a day, a week, a month, or a year, it is the struggle of a lifetime. Never, ever be afraid to make some noise and get in good trouble, necessary trouble." These are simple but yet extremely powerful words we should all live by, especially when so much injustice continues to happen every day.

I would like to thank Jon Meacham, Random House Publishing Group-Random House and NetGalley for allowing me the opportunity to read and review an advance reader copy of this book. My views are my own, and are in no way influenced by anyone else.
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Scott J Pearson
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A challenging tale of a great human spirit who fought for dignity and love for over fifty years
Reviewed in the United States on September 6, 2020
The recently deceased congressman John Lewis has been a public light to the United States for over fifty years. Nicknamed “the conscience of Congress,” he courageously campaigned for civil rights since a college student in Nashville. The author Jon Meacham, surely one of... See more
The recently deceased congressman John Lewis has been a public light to the United States for over fifty years. Nicknamed “the conscience of Congress,” he courageously campaigned for civil rights since a college student in Nashville. The author Jon Meacham, surely one of America’s greatest biographers, writes this history of Lewis’ doings in the 1960s. With extreme acuity, gravity, and imagery, he captures what the civil rights movement resembled on the inside. In so doing, he memorializes Lewis in a way that proudly continues Lewis’ unique legacy.

I can compare reading the early chapters of this book to only one life experience – a tour of the Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tennessee. I was emotionally overwhelmed and captivated by the national struggle to love all races. Meacham’s research and writing so excels that he makes us see the world through Lewis’ eyes. And of course, Lewis’ vision of the world, captured in Dr. King’s phrase “the beloved community,” was and is one that ought to be held onto.

Lewis and others had to endure much to receive their just place in American culture. Regardless of one’s politics, ethnicity, or nationality, this story needs to be retold again and again. Lewis’ particular tale is one of courage, suffering, and eventual triumph. He famously even had his skull cracked by police in Selma, Alabama, as a testimony that black lives count for something. A photograph of him seeing recent Black Lives Matter protests precedes an afterword in the book by Lewis himself.

The main weakness of this book lies in its brevity. It only recounts about a decade of drama in Lewis’ life. I am left wanting to know this great human more. I am left wanting to learn about how he implemented his vision in one of the most difficult of all places – the United States Congress. I am left wanting to hear about his gentility as he transformed from a civil-rights soldier to dignified leader, much in the way that Washington, Grant, and Eisenhower have. Lewis’ greatness is not restricted to reactions to his skin color in the 1960s American South; it spans to his universal vision for the world. Meacham leaves us with an epilogue that describes such – again, I want more.

In an age of partisanship and vacuous national leadership, I hope that many read this work. It’s not inspiring. It’s tragic and sad, even disheartening. How can fellow human beings treat each other so poorly? This work corrects such prejudices and expresses deep determination to fight for what’s right and good and, dare I say, holy in this world. In the process of reading, it made me examine my own conscience and place in this world. Like all good expressions of the human spirit, it leaves me just wanting more.
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David H. (Austin)
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Justice deferred — still
Reviewed in the United States on September 8, 2020
The American people recently lost two giants of the civil rights movement: Elijah Cummings in 2019; and John Lewis in 2020. Historian Jon Meecham’s new book highlights the truly incredible story of John Lewis, who’s moral superiority laid bare the moral corruption of bigots... See more
The American people recently lost two giants of the civil rights movement: Elijah Cummings in 2019; and John Lewis in 2020. Historian Jon Meecham’s new book highlights the truly incredible story of John Lewis, who’s moral superiority laid bare the moral corruption of bigots and racists in general, and in the South in particular. Many others have already said a lot about this book; I want to discuss topics that were, and are, things of particular interest to me

First and foremost John Lewis was always guided by his deeply felt, and true, Christianity and his utter belief in non-violence. In a longish life I have met and heard many persons who called themselves Christians who were anything but. John Lewis never wavered and his moral rectitude was matched by his physical bravery, even though he often demurred about the courage he had to face his persecutors.

Secondly, I had no idea just how he was instrumental in the successes of the civil rights struggle. He was a trusted colleague of the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.; he faced down Presidents John Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson; and Lewis basically ‘converted’ Robert Kennedy to the movement. All the while Lewis was self-effacing but firm.

As for this book as a biography, Meacham makes it clear that his effort is not a traditional biography in the sense that traditional biographies purport to be in-depth and rich in details (when sources are plentiful). Instead his book covers Lewis’ affect on a movement with many parts and heroes. For myself I found myself profoundly moved by Lewis’ speeches and, in addition, the speeches of other leaders, especially those of Reverend King. Also, surprisingly, President Johnson’s speech to put over the Civil Rights Act in Congress. I’m not much for speeches, but I was floored by the eloquence of these speakers.

Just one cavil: while John Lewis lived his religion in everything he did, and his was the epitome of a Christian life well led. The author, though, implies that only Christians are able to bring civil rights to fruition in this country. John Lewis and most of his fellow warriors in the struggle for racial equality were informed by their faith and there should be no doubt that that faith was decisive in their successes. However, Meacham knows, I hope, that sacerdotal influence is not required for justice to be done. This tormented country, especially in 2020, will need good people of all faiths and creeds to complete the work of men and women like John Lewis and those people will need the support of secularists whose primary concern in life — is Justice.
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K G
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
another masterpiece from John meacham
Reviewed in the United States on August 28, 2020
a wonderful book on a remarkable man John Lewis rest in peace,done another masterpiece from John Meacham one of many books I must own that he wrote
22 people found this helpful
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J. A Bowen
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A good place to start
Reviewed in the United States on October 31, 2020
"His Truth Is Marching On: John Lewis and the Power of Hope" is not meant to be a full-scale biography, by Meacham''s own admission. I read "Walking with the Wind", John Lewis'' autobiography first, so I think I was bound to be disappointed by anything else. That amazing... See more
"His Truth Is Marching On: John Lewis and the Power of Hope" is not meant to be a full-scale biography, by Meacham''s own admission. I read "Walking with the Wind", John Lewis'' autobiography first, so I think I was bound to be disappointed by anything else. That amazing book held me in thrall for most of July, as the country seethed over the deaths of George Floyd and Breanna Taylor. I had never really read much about the Freedom Rides or the initiatives on voter registration in places like Neshoba, Mississippi. It was horrifying and mesmerizing at the same time, and horrible to witness how little, really, things have changed. But back to "His Truth." Elegantly written, with much feeling and reverence for this humble, incredibly brave civil rights icon, John Lewis, who passed away July 17, 2020. The book hits all the high points, but also leaves much out. If you want an education on the civil rights era, and on John Lewis, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (of which he was leader for quite awhile), the fascinating and brilliant characters like Martin Luther King, Jr., James Lawson, Bayard Rustin, Diane Nash, and the rest, as well as the ending of Jim Crow -- this is a good place to start. I love Meacham''s writing. "The Soul of America" is one of his best books, in my opinion. "His Truth is Marching On," is more a homage to a very great, irreplaceable , in his word, "saint" -- John Lewis.
9 people found this helpful
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Warren Merkle
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
One of the Best Books
Reviewed in the United States on August 27, 2020
Jon Meachum proves once again that he is America''s foremost historian and author. His writing style is detailed but with a poetic flair that no one else has today. He has also captured the essence of one of America''s true Giants that should be memorialized in every history... See more
Jon Meachum proves once again that he is America''s foremost historian and author. His writing style is detailed but with a poetic flair that no one else has today. He has also captured the essence of one of America''s true Giants that should be memorialized in every history book utilized in our schools. John Lewis led by example and with compassion. Buy the book for your kids.
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Top reviews from other countries

GJB
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The headline is in the title
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 9, 2021
I have read many books on this period of history and John Lewis should rank alongside MLK. This is well written so that even a casual observe can get benefits from reading. I think Jon Meacham really brings great feeling for the intensity John Lewis brought to the Movement...See more
I have read many books on this period of history and John Lewis should rank alongside MLK. This is well written so that even a casual observe can get benefits from reading. I think Jon Meacham really brings great feeling for the intensity John Lewis brought to the Movement and shares his love of people. The humanity of John Lewis is really brought to the fore and while he wouldn’t say he was a saint at the present time he was most probably as near as anybody. Excellent book worked well with additions from Mr Lewis and definitely brings out the respect from both parties.
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David Castaldo
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Brilliant Read
Reviewed in Canada on October 9, 2020
An absolute brilliant read. Jon Meacham does an wonderful job of bringing this amazing life of John Lewis to us. Front cover to cover you will take a journey like no other. A book that should be in every high school as part of their history class. This book is worth your...See more
An absolute brilliant read. Jon Meacham does an wonderful job of bringing this amazing life of John Lewis to us. Front cover to cover you will take a journey like no other. A book that should be in every high school as part of their history class. This book is worth your time.
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Alan G
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Truth is in the Reading
Reviewed in Canada on September 26, 2020
Outstanding book that brings to life the turmoil of the USA in the 60''s and as we read can see that turmoil still around us. Stories of extraordinary men and women, some whose lives were taken. The book will not put you to sleep but will create an awakening within
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Tai T. Wong
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Clear Insight to John Lewis
Reviewed in Canada on September 21, 2020
Meacham is able to "state his case, of which he is certain" (paraphrasing Paul Anka) - a very informative and insiring read.
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Francis Felician
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great read!
Reviewed in Canada on February 22, 2021
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